Loading... Please wait...

Our Newsletter


Oil Pan Guide from LSenginediy.com

  • Image 1
Price:
$0.00
Weight:
0.00 LBS
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout
Quantity:


Product Description

LS SWAPS: Oil Pan Guide

Once the motor mounts have been sorted out, the next step is to choose an oil pan. Many stock oil pans are available for LS engines, each one designed for a specific chassis. With so many different oil-pan options, there is confusion as to which oil pans fit which chassis.

 


This Tech Tip is From the Full Book, LS SWAPS: HOW TO SWAP GM LS ENGINES INTO ALMOST ANYTHING. For a comprehensive guide on this entire subject you can visit this link:
LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK HERE

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE: Please feel free to share this article on Facebook, in Forums, or with any Clubs you participate in. You can copy and paste this link to share: http://www.lsenginediy.com/ls-swaps-oil-pan-guide/


 

The relationship between the front crossmember and the motor mounts determines the fit of the oil pan. Each brand of motor mount is different, and the engine-mount towers used on the frames can differ by application as well. Although there are several stock pans that fit certain vehicles, they don’t always fit as is, and there are different depths and clearances. In the end, there will probably be some trial-and-error test fitting to find just the right pan.

 

The 1998–2002 F-Body LS1 pan is the most commonly used LS oil pan. Typically referred to as the F-Body or Camaro pan, it works well with custom chassis crossmembers, and it is also the most frequently modified pan. It fits most 1958–1964 GM cars without any modifications. (Photo Courtesy Chevrolet Performance

The 1998–2002 F-Body LS1 pan is the most commonly used LS oil pan. Typically referred to as the F-Body or Camaro pan, it works well with custom chassis crossmembers, and it is also the most frequently modified pan. It fits most 1958–1964 GM cars without any modifications. (Photo Courtesy Chevrolet Performance


 

 

Usually, a stock oil pan and stock crossmember can be modified to a particular chassis. In many cases, cutting a small notch on the back side of the crossmember, then filling it with 1/4-inch steel (boxing it in), reinforces and strengthens the cross-member while allowing the engine to sit in place. However, this does not work for every application.

 

Stock Oil Pans

Using a stock oil pan can greatly simplify the installation, provided it’s the right one. There are many designs, but only a few are desirable for engine swaps. These are the 1998–2002 Camaro, the 2002–2006 truck, the C5 Corvette “Y” (also referred to as the “batwing” due to the dual kickouts on the sides), and the Cadillac CTS-V pans. These stock oil pans have proven to be the most versatile and fit many vehicles without modifications. There are, of course, many other pans that might fit.

Popular LS swap platforms have had the oil-pan fitment issue hashed and rehashed since the first LS swap was done. The problems arise when you swap an LS engine into something that is not a typical GM A-Body, truck, or F-Body. These issues must be addressed when mocking up the motor mounts and modifying or building the front crossmember. Sump depth also needs to be considered, as several stock pans may clear the chassis itself, but ground clearance can become an issue when the sump hangs below the crossmember, especially on lowered vehicles.

In a typical installation, more than one pan probably fits the vehicle. Case in point: the LH8 oil pan (a special pan for the 5.3-powered Hummer H3) easily fits GM A-Body cars. However, with a typical adapter plate and motor mount installed, the LH8 pan rear sump hangs about 11⁄2inches below the engine cross-member. This is acceptable for standard-suspension-height cars, but if the car has a low ride height (especially an air-ride suspension) there may not be enough clearance between the pan and the pavement, and it could be damaged.

 

2

This diagram shows the three most common LS pans and their measurements. In order to select the right pan for your swap, consider the engine bay, crossmember, and steering clearances. Each pan requires a dedicated pick-up tube and windage tray. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

 

The Brewer’s Restoration and Performance motor mount kits use the LH8 oil pan, but the motor mounts are specialized and position the engine differently in the car than most other adapter kit installations, allowing the LH8 pan to work quite well. Additionally, each oil pan requires its own specific wind-age tray, pick-up tube, and dipstick. When selecting an oil pan, make sure it comes with these parts so they don’t have to be purchased later.

Several blocks and oil-pan configurations place the dipstick tube in the pan rather than in the block. In order to use a non-dipstick tube pan on these engines, the machined boss on the passenger’s side of the block must be drilled out. Using a 3/8-inch drill bit, drill it through (about 1/8 inch of material), and slide the tube right in.

One more note on factory oil pans: they can be swapped from engine to engine, but there are a few points that need to be considered. The pick-up tube and windage tray go with the oil pan, not the engine. These items are a matched set, so anytime an oil pan is swapped, the correct tube and windage tray must be swapped as well.

Additionally, displacement on demand (DoD) engines have an oil-pressure bypass valve built into the oil pan. If the DoD system isn’t going to be used, then it doesn’t matter. For engine swaps using the DoD system, however, an oil pan with the bypass valve must be used.

F-Body Camaro/Firebird Oil Pan  (PN 12558762)

The most commonly used stock oil pan is the Camaro/Firebird pan. According to Street & Performance, the 1998–2002 Camaro/Firebird IROC pan fits 1958–1964 GM cars without modification, though the fit is tight.

All 1955–1957 and 1965–up GM cars require modifications to the Camaro oil pan. The problem here is that the oil pan interferes with the front crossmember, keeping the engine from sitting down on the mounts. About 2 inches of depth must be removed from the front edge of the rear sump, along with a large section of the front of the sump. The aluminum oil pan must be tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded, and even an experienced welder can quickly ruin an oil pan. Therefore, consider buying a modified or custom aftermarket oil pan.

Some builders have used the Camaro pan in 1965-up GM muscle cars without modification. They used their own custom-built motor mounts. It depends on the particular engine/transmission package and chassis as to whether this pan fits unmodified.

The Camaro oil pan also fits well, unmodified, in the C2 (1962–1967) and C3 (1968–1982) Corvettes. The F-Body oil pan’s rear sump measures 5 inches deep, 111⁄2 inches long, and 91⁄2inches wide. The shallow front section is where most of the interference occurs. The frontmost section is flat for 41⁄4 inches, and then slopes at a steep angle for 43⁄4 inches. About 11⁄2 inches of the sump’s depth must be removed from the first 4 inches of the front section of the rear sump to allow it to fit into the 1967–1969 F-Body.

Many swappers use this pan in stock form for Fox-Body Mustang swaps.

2002–2006 C/K Truck Oil Pan  (PN 12579273)

This oil pan is fitted to all 4.8-, 5.3-, and 6.0-liter C/K trucks and Escalades. This pan features a long, shallow front section (121⁄4 inches) with a crossmember-friendly, short, 83⁄4-inch-long rear sump. The rear sump is quite deep (81⁄4 inches), making it a poor candidate for most car applications. It is, however, a great pan for trucks, and it fits without modification in 1960–up Chevy and GMC trucks and SUVs (Blazer, Suburban, etc.).

This pan can be used in GM A-Body cars (Chevelle, GTO, Buick GS, etc.), but has a tendency to become a victim of road debris due to the deep sump and resulting low ground clearance.

 

Early Vortec oil pans fit many vehicles, but the deep rear sump can be problematic due to lack of ground clearance. Most trucks accept this pan with ease. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

Early Vortec oil pans fit many vehicles, but the deep rear sump can be problematic due to lack of ground clearance. Most trucks accept this pan with ease. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

 

The 2007-up Vortec pan works well in the 1960-up GM truck swaps, but the deeper pan can be an issue for lowered trucks and cars. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)

The 2007-up Vortec pan works well in the 1960-up GM truck swaps, but the deeper pan can be an issue for lowered trucks and cars. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)

 

 

The famous batwing oil pan works well for street rods, early Corvettes (C1, C2, and C3), and just about anything using a Mustang-II-style front crossmember and suspension. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)

The famous batwing oil pan works well for street rods, early Corvettes (C1, C2, and C3), and just about anything using a Mustang-II-style front crossmember and suspension. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)


 

 

2007–Up GM Truck Oil Pan  (PN 12609074)

The 2007–up GM trucks with the 4.8-, 5.3-, 6.0-, and 6.2-liter Gen IV engines come with this oil pan. Basically the same as the 2002–2006 C/K truck pan, it has a shorter, shallow front section at 111⁄2 inches, and a slightly longer rear sump at 93⁄4 inches. The rear sump depth remains the same at 81⁄4 inches. This pan fits all 1960-up Chevy and GMC trucks.

 

LSB   
 

The 2007–up GM trucks with the 4.8-, 5.3-, 6.0-, and 6.2-liter Gen IV engines come with this oil pan. Basically the same as the 2002–2006 C/K truck pan, it has a shorter, shallow front section at 111⁄2 inches, and a slightly longer rear sump at 93⁄4 inches. The rear sump depth remains the same at 81⁄4 inches. This pan fits all 1960-up Chevy and GMC trucks.

C5 Corvette “Y” Oil Pan (PN 12561828)

With one kickout on each side, this pan is typically referred to as the “batwing” pan because the kickouts resemble wings. This race-inspired design allows for consistent pick-up coverage under high lateral g-force turns. The pan is very shallow (43⁄4 inches top to bottom) and has 201⁄2-inch-wide kickouts that prevent it from working in most stock muscle cars.

This pan is widely used in any car with a Mustang II–style suspension, one of the most popular suspension swaps. Most aftermarket street rod frames (TCI, Heidts, Fat Man Fabrications, etc.) use a Mustang II suspension, so this is the pan of choice.

This pan also fits the C4 Corvette (1984–1996), simplifying the LS swap for C4 Corvettes.

Cadillac CTS-V Oil Pan 2004–2007, 2009–up

Available on the Cadillac CTS-V, this oil pan is basically a cross between the F-Body and the C/K truck pans. The rear sump is 51⁄2 inches deep, 3 inches less than the truck pan and 1/2 inch deeper than the F-Body pan. The shallow front section is 11 inches long, which is shorter than the truck pan, but longer than the F-Body.

Standard adapter plates can be used, setting the motor low in the car and clearing the engine crossmember. The CTS-V pan hangs below the front crossmember by about 1 inch on 1965–1972 GM A-Bodies (Chevy Chevelle, Buick Gran Sport, Pontiac GTO, etc.) and 1978–1988 G-Bodies (Buick Regal, Chevy Monte Carlo). It depends on which motor mounts are used, as some mounts such as the Trans-Dapt adapter plates place the engine slightly higher in the car,reducing the amount of overhang.

 

The CTS-V Cadillac oil pan works well in trucks and muscle cars, although the rear sump is deeper than an F-Body pan. This means the pan might hang below the crossmember, depending on the motor mounts, but it is still a great option for a stock pan. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

The CTS-V Cadillac oil pan works well in trucks and muscle cars, although the rear sump is deeper than an F-Body pan. This means the pan might hang below the crossmember, depending on the motor mounts, but it is still a great option for a stock pan. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

 

 

Some manufacturers have used the LH8 oil pan for all of their LS swap kits. For the universal-style adapter plates, it may or may not hang too low under the crossmember. Lowered muscle cars should stay away from this pan unless it is specifically required for a kit. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)

Some manufacturers have used the LH8 oil pan for all of their LS swap kits. For the universal-style adapter plates, it may or may not hang too low under the crossmember. Lowered muscle cars should stay away from this pan unless it is specifically required for a kit. (Photo Courtesy Paul Chiver)


 

 

This is an excellent pan for Fox-Body Mustang swaps using the stock K-member. Later-model CTS-V cars with an LSA use a similar oil pan, with a few minor differences. The external dimensions are the same; however, the LSA pan has larger oil filter threads, a different oil-pressure sending unit boss, and oil cooler bosses.

Hummer H3 Alpha 5.3 Oil Pan  (PN 12614821)

The H3 oil pan is commonly referred to as the LH8 (for the Hummer H3 5.3L LS engine code). First available in late 2007, its measurements caused quite a stir in the LS swap community because the long, 13-inch shallow front section allows this pan to clear most stock GM crossmembers without modification. Again, though, this pan has a 71⁄2-inch-deep rear sump, making it hang about 11⁄2 to 2 inches below the crossmember. A stock suspension on a car is able to clear the road, but any lowering and this pan could be an issue.

Corvette LS2 Oil Pan  (PN 12581810)

The LS2 Corvette oil pan falls in the “maybe” category of fitment. Its 5-inch-deep rear sump certainly clears the road, but the 131⁄2-inch length of the sump prevents this pan from being used in most muscle car chassis. Although it can be modified for a particular vehicle, thanks to the relatively flat and square rear sump, it might not be worth it to buy this pan for a muscle car application.

 

The LS2 Corvette oil pan must be modified to fit GM muscle car chassis designs, which is relatively simple because it’s mostly flat. The modifications depend on the specific application. Keep in mind that any modification to the depth or sidewall of the pan requires modifying the pick-up tube. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

The LS2 Corvette oil pan must be modified to fit GM muscle car chassis designs, which is relatively simple because it’s mostly flat. The modifications depend on the specific application. Keep in mind that any modification to the depth or sidewall of the pan requires modifying the pick-up tube. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)


 

 

Corvette LS7 Dry-Sump Oil Pan

The LS7 is a specialized pan that only fits the LS7. This is a dry-sump oiling system and requires a lot of special consideration. For swap-ping an LS7 into a GM muscle car, an aftermarket oil pan is required. Modifying the stock pan is not a simple task because of the internal oil-routing design. ATS offers a sheet-metal oil pan for the LS7 that fits the first-generation F-Body (1967–1969 Chevy Camaro/Pontiac Firebird). Although this pan was designed for the F-Body, it fits most GM muscle cars as well.

 

This polished LS7 oil pan shows the dry-sump output lines, which must run to the dry-sump oil tank. The tank can be mounted in almost any convenient location under the hood. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

This polished LS7 oil pan shows the dry-sump output lines, which must run to the dry-sump oil tank. The tank can be mounted in almost any convenient location under the hood. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

 

Many different oil tanks are available. This is the stock LS7 oil tank and its lines. It can be polished for show vehicles or hidden away, but must be easily accessed. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

Many different oil tanks are available. This is the stock LS7 oil tank and its lines. It can be polished for show vehicles or hidden away, but must be easily accessed. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

On LS7 engines, the dipstick is located in the oil tank. All of the engine’s oil is stored in this tank. A secure mount is of critical importance. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

On LS7 engines, the dipstick is located in the oil tank. All of the engine’s oil is stored in this tank. A secure mount is of critical importance. (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

 

 

Each oil pan also requires its own specific pick-up tube. Shown are a modified F-Body pick-up tube (top) and a stock F-Body tube (bottom). (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)

Each oil pan also requires its own specific pick-up tube. Shown are a modified F-Body pick-up tube (top) and a stock F-Body tube (bottom). (Photo Courtesy Street & Performance)


 

 

GTO LS3 Oil Pan

Many swap platforms require a front-sump oil pan in order to clear the crossmember or rear-steer steering links or racks. The GTO pan works well in these situations. The early Mustangs and Nissan/Datsun Z-cars typically work with a GTO pan.

LS3/LSA 2010–Up Camaro

The fifth-generation Camaro uses a different oil pan than the fourth-generation F-Body. The newest Camaro pan has a long rear sump that doesn’t clear the front crossmember on many muscle cars, leaving it out as a versatile pan for swappers.

 

LSB   
 

LS9 Corvette ZR1

Like the LS7, the LS9 in the ZR1 Corvette is a dry-sump design. It can be retrofitted to other blocks, but considering the money necessary to buy the factory unit, an aftermarket dry-sump pan likely fits better and costs less.

 

Aftermarket Gen III/IV  Oil Pans

With so many options and potential pitfalls, many builders choose an aftermarket oil pan that fits specific vehicles. There are many versions, and most are one of two platforms: the first-generation F-Body 1967–1969 Chevy Camaro and Pontiac Firebird; and the 1965–1972 GM A-Body cars, such as the Chevy Chevelle, Pontiac GTO, Buick GS/Skylark, and Oldsmobile Cutlass/442.

 

The 2010–up Camaro uses this oil pan for the LS3 and LSA engines. It has pro-visions for mounting an oil cooler. Its odd shape makes it a tricky pan for swappers. Improved Racing made the internal baffling in this pan. (Photo Courtesy Improved Racing)

The 2010–up Camaro uses this oil pan for the LS3 and LSA engines. It has pro-visions for mounting an oil cooler. Its odd shape makes it a tricky pan for swappers. Improved Racing made the internal baffling in this pan. (Photo Courtesy Improved Racing)


 

 

Most fabricated (meaning welded steel or aluminum, not cast) after-market oil pans require the use of a remote oil filter. This is a major draw-back for some builders, as a suitable location for the filter and lines must now be considered. This is not always the case, however, as there are several aftermarket pans that maintain the pan-mounted filter, such as the Holley LSX-swap cast-aluminum pan.

 

Oil Coolers

Oil temperature is important, especially for road racing or running superchargers and turbos. Maintaining proper engine oil temperature is critical to the life of the engine and the usable life of the oil. Chevrolet suggests running your engine oil between 220 and 240 degrees F at full warm-up. This is higher than the previously acceptable range of 190 to 220, and is a point of contention among experts. That doesn’t change the fact that anything over 250 degrees begins to break down the oil, dramatically reducing its usable life.

Colder oil temperatures are also an issue and rob the engine of power. The cooler the oil, the thicker it is, and LS engines run tighter tolerances than the old small-block Chevy. That means there is less oil inside the bearings, increasing friction and costing more power. Heat the oil a little more and it flows better, reducing the friction and freeing up a little extra power, not to mention adding life to the engine.

Another side effect of running the engine oil too cool is the lack of sufficient burn-off temperature. Engine oil becomes contaminated with fuel and water through condensation. When the oil reaches 200 degrees F, the fuel and water begin to burn off. Although this is necessary for a naturally aspirated engine, it is critical for a turbocharged engine as the turbos are cooled through the engine oil system. Water and fuel in the oil can destroy turbo bearings in a hurry.

Thermostatic Bypass

Adding an oil cooler is an easy way to maintain the correct engine oil temperatures, but simply adding an in-line cooler is not the answer. If the oil is allowed to flow through the cooler, it takes longer to warm up and runs cooler overall. The key to a proper oil cooling system is thermostatic bypass.

All factory LS engine oil pans have an oil bypass port built right into the side of the pan above the oil filter. These ports can be used for the oil cooler lines (as well as the oil-pressure sending unit, more on that later) or an oil filter sandwich-type adapter. A thermostatic bypass port allows the engine oil to circulate through the cooler only after it reaches a certain temperature, allowing the oil to warm up faster. If it cools too quickly in the cooler the bypass closes, maintaining a consistent minimum temperature. These types of valves can be found in adjustable versions, but are typically sold as static versions, usually opening at 180 degrees and fully open at 200 degrees.

 

Holley came into the oil pan market with its LSX retrofit pan. This aluminum oil pan features a stock-style oil filter mount and has adequate clearance for most popular swaps. It is also a beefy design, with thick casting ridges for strength. (Photo Courtesy Holley Performance Products)

Holley came into the oil pan market with its LSX retrofit pan. This aluminum oil pan features a stock-style oil filter mount and has adequate clearance for most popular swaps. It is also a beefy design, with thick casting ridges for strength. (Photo Courtesy Holley Performance Products)

 

 

 

Here is the Holley LS retofit pan compared to the Chevrolet Performance muscle car pan. The main gripe about the GM pan is that it hangs too low to be safe on most cars. The Holley pan corrected that problem. (Photo Courtesy Holley Performance Products)

Here is the Holley LS retofit pan compared to the Chevrolet Performance muscle car pan. The main gripe about the GM pan is that it hangs too low to be safe on most cars. The Holley pan corrected that problem. (Photo Courtesy Holley Performance Products)


 

 

Several Gen III/IV LS engines even have oil coolers built into them, namely the high-performance versions and some of the Vortec heavy-duty applications. If you choose to run an aftermarket oil pan with a remote oil filter, the plumbing allows you to add an in-line cooler. There are thermostatic bypasses available for this design as well.

Cooler Location

Locating the cooler is fairly simple, most of the time. The cooler is mounted in front of the radiator or A/C condenser, but it doesn’t have to go there. It can be mounted just about anywhere as long as it gets enough airflow. “Hot rod”–style coolers mount on the frame itself. Some even have 12-volt fans for forced-air cooling. There are a lot of options, but the simplest solution is a radiator front mount.

Oil Filter

As previously mentioned, many aftermarket oil pans do not have factory-style oil filter mounts, only ports for the oil feed and return lines. This means you must run a remote oil filter. Locating the oil filter can be a challenge in many applications, but it is a necessary component. If you use an oil cooler, the filter can be located in the same location.

The key here is to have easy access to the filter and protection from road debris. If the filter is hanging too low, it could get damaged, resulting in a shattered engine. The lines for the oil filter do not have to be high-pressure, but braided lines certainly look good and reduce the chances for leaks or blowouts from cut or damaged lines.

Also keep in mind that the ports are not labeled on LS engines, and some oil pans do not include instructions indicating what port is pressure/return. The pressure port is the front (toward the belts) one; the return is the rearmost port.

 

Feature Vehicle: BMW E36

Feature Vehicle : Photos courtesy Vorshlag Motorsports and Brandon LaJoie

Photos courtesy Vorshlag Motorsports and Brandon LaJoie

 

The team at Vorshlag combined the most popular BMW of all time, the E36 3-Series sport coupe platform, with one of the most popular GM engine series, the LS Gen III/IV, to create a winner. This kit helps to build one of the most agile and powerful European sports coupes ever. The lightweight BMW E36 (2,500 to 3,500 pounds) and the powerful Gen III/IV engines make the possibilities endless. The Vorshlag components are essential for packaging the LS engine and front subframe components.

This kit allows the BMW rack-and-pinion steering and anti-locking braking system (ABS) to remain in the vehicle, unlike some other kits. The entire process has been reduced to a simple matter of following instructions, thereby reducing the fabrication time and cost. The basics (motor mounts, transmission crossmember, headers, steering shaft, driveshaft) are all included in the Stage 0 kit. (The Stage 1 kit includes the radiator, coolant hoses, power steering hoses, fuel line connections, fuel pump, custom T56 hydraulic throw-out bearing, and remote bleed).

The basic Stage 0 kit provides all the parts to make the engine and transmission fit and function correctly. The round polyurethane motor mounts are powdercoated. The mounts are a bolt-in item, and the frame stands bolt to the BMW chassis. The upper clamshell bolts to the engine, then the two pieces are mated as the engine is lowered into place. The transmission crossmember is also a bolt-in item.

The kit is designed for a T56 manual transmission. An automatic can fit in the BMW chassis, but that requires you to build a custom crossmember. The floorpan opening is very close to matching the T56 shifter location, and a bit of trimming is usually required to get it just right. There are multiple shifter configurations, so this process varies by each build.

The kit is designed for a T56 manual transmission. An automatic can fit in the BMW chassis, but that requires you to build a custom crossmember. The floorpan opening is very close to matching the T56 shifter location, and a bit of trimming is usually required to get it just right. There are multiple shifter configurations, so this process varies by each build.

The ABS and steering systems are a major part of what makes the E36 BMW handle so well; this kit retains those factory systems, keeping the “BMW” in the car. You replace the steering shaft with a new unit that allows clearance for the headers and motor mounts.

One of the most contentious components of any engine swap is the exhaust. Headers are always a difficult endeavor. These are no exception. Instead of a traditional header collector flange, these headers feature a round pipe with no flange at all. That is because there simply is not enough room to slide the headers into the car with a flange installed—it’s a tight fit. To connect the headers to the rest of the exhaust, you use a set of included V-band clamps. These clamps have a double-wall design to seal the tubing from the inside and the outside, which is a unique design that greatly benefits this swap.

The last piece of the Stage 0 puzzle is the custom aluminum driveshaft. Again, this fits the T56 transmissions, not an automatic. The last piece of the Stage 0 puzzle is the custom aluminum driveshaft. Again, this fits the T56 transmissions, not an automatic.

The installation of the Vorshlag kit is straightforward, with only minor modifications to the chassis itself. All of the kit’s components are designed to work together, not as mix-and-match components. This is an LS swap system, not just a kit.

Write your own product review

Product Reviews

This product hasn't received any reviews yet. Be the first to review this product!

Add to Wish List

Click the button below to add the Oil Pan Guide from LSenginediy.com to your wish list.

You Recently Viewed...